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Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
saying we ought to be reality-based and science-based. we need to go back to a science and reality-based approach to policymaking. and by the way, i sit on the armed services committee and who leads the fight on the climate change in a smart and 21st century way. it is the military because they know that energy security will benefit us. that there will be environmental benefits and that the job creation will help get our economy back. >> jennifer: they're defending our country to make us independent from foreign oil too. it is lives in our military. i gotta go. but senator i just so appreciate you joining me inside "the war room." you're thoughtful. you're a battler for the things that are important. hopefully we can get you more help after the election. thanks for joining us. >> thank you. >>. >> jennifer: up next, the president has numerous foreign policy achievements that he can claim. but what about mitt romney's foreign policy credentials other than insulting the british at the olympics? and there's a ne
their children educated. they want to get our edge back in science, and they want a policy headed by the president that helps close this gap that's widening between the united states and europe and japan. the american people want to keep opening doors. they want those civil rights laws enforced. they want the equal rights amendment ratified. they want equal pay for comparable effort for women. and they want it because they've understood from the beginning that when we open doors, we're all stronger, just as we were at the olympics. i think as you make the case, the american people will increasingly come to our cause. itmr. mondale, isn't possible that the american people have heard your message -- and they are listening -- but they are rejecting it? >> well, tonight we had the first debate over the deficit. the president says it'll disappear automatically. i've said it's going to take some work. i think the american people will draw their own conclusions. secondly, i've said that i will not support the cuts in social security and medicare and the rest that the president has propos
're the -- >> are they luddit, anti-science? >> i think if they're convinced, as many of them are, that science is being used as a conspiracy to take away their freedom and take away their dependence -- >> i saw that movie, it's called "planet of the apes" and it wasn't a comedy. >>i're a ln to -- we watch fox, we listen because have you to cover the wholspectrum as a reporter, that's the -- that's the message that you get. that the scientists and the bureaucrats are combining to rob us of our freedom. >> so it's basically a fear, ar vein take a look at this number though. the infamous birther question. was the president born in the united states? unounstie to be born here to be president. ohio republican primary voters, people who voted already this year, 37% don't think barack obama was born here. just 2 in 5 say the president was american born and, therefore, a legitimate president. when you ask the president's religion, this gets scary. a majority of all voters don't take him at his word. just 49%. rin,ch is what he saysy he's he is. and 30% of republicans and 34% of conservative republicans say obama is
question. that is sort of as much political science at something else. a big political factor, i don't want to sound too nerdy about this, but the rise of computer aids for districts are, the members of congress, state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic, all republican. there are relatively few seats. we have seen a bunch of change in the past couple of elections, but that is very much the exception rather than the rule. some members of the house of representatives fear, figure primaries more than they fear general elections, by and large. thus, they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that does not fully explain the senate. because you can't redistricted senate, but it has had an enormous impact on the state and that the state legislature level. in the more polarized politics that we have. i also think that the news media plays a role in this. it used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news. and everybody watches walter cronkite and they sort of made an effort to, you know, you could ar
y. 're the simplicity party. they're the -- >> are they lud indicts, anti-science? >> i think if they're convinced, as many of them are, that science is being used as a conspiracy to take away their deen- m and take away their shamovie, it's called "planet of the apes" and it wasn't a comedy pup. >>e watch fox, we listen to it, that's the message that you get. that the scientists and t aus cni t us of our freedom. >> so it's basically a fear, it's a fear of everything. take a look at this number though. the infamous birth question, was the president born in the united states. under our constitution he has t be born here to be prid rlipryvoters, 37% they do not think barack obama was born here. just 2 in 5 say the president was american born and, therefore, a legitimate president. when you ask the president's religion, this gets scary. a majority of all voters don't take him atis word. just 49%. this is all vote, sa he' st w i what he says he is. and 30% of republicans and 34% of conservative republicans say obama is a muslim. simple as that. here is the point. these bad numbe
. samuel popkin who is a professor of political science at the university of san diego. he has worked on campaigns going back to the 1970s, and he is also the author of "the candidate." welcome back inside "the war room," profez or. >> it's a pleasure to be back with you governor. >> jennifer: all right. do you think this has been taken to a new level this year? >> i think it has been taken to a new level every year and gets more mindless meaningless and irrelevant every year. >> jennifer: i love that. because? because? is it going to matter? >> no, nobody cares what you thought going in. if you think your team is going to lose and they lose is that better than if you think they are going to win and they lose. [ laughter ] >> what counts is what happens in the debate not what you tell people. this is like a high school pep rally. >> jennifer: all right. i want to talk a little bit about prep because you had some very interesting experiences. you played ronald reagan for jimmy carter ahead of the 1980 debates, and in your book you write this about what hand to preside
acknowledges and celebrates recovery from addiction and mental illness, of advances int science -- through evidence based practices and thousands upon thousands of united voices of recovery across the country. recovery has captured an audience and is rallying in nations. about this time two years ago leaders and the liberal health field, consisting of people in recovery from mental health and substance abuse, met -- in on these efforts and in consultation with many stakeholders, samhsa has come up with a working definition and set of principles for recovery. i invite you to go on for .samhsa.gov.ww defining it has been a true process. now we are working with persons and recovery for mental illness and substance abuse to articulate the differences. as well as the commonalities of these respective prophecies. we agree on the guiding principles to recovery through terms and concepts such as hope pacs, a person driven, a holistic work. many pathways, relational, culture, addressing a trauma, strength and responsibility, and respect. a bit later in the program you will hear directly from a few
. the science writer and columnist for discover magazine will look at the cyberworld popular culture and computer networking and politics. lives in their october 7 at noon eastern on c-span2 book tv. up next, a debate between kendis to be the next governor of new hampshire. the republican candidates unsuccessfully ran for governor in 1996 and was the republican nominee for the u.s. senate in 2010. democrat is a former new hampshire state senator who served as the majority leader. this took place in manchester, new hampshire and comes to us from new hampshire public broadcasting and is about an hour. >> welcome to the candidates' forum on business and the economy. i am most of the exchange. we are coming to you from the television studios at the new hampshire is to to the politics that political library. for the next hour we will hear from new hampshire is gubernatorial candidates. we will press them to talk about what they would do as governor and refrain from spending valuable time attacking each other. and now let me introduce our candid it's. they are republican ovide lamontagne a
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> you got obama phone? >> yes, everybody in cleveland, all minority got obama phone. keep obama in president, you know. he gave us a phone. >> he gave you a phone? how did he give you a phone? >> you sign up. you're on social security, you got low-income, you disability. >> sean: all right. so we had obama phone. maybe obama bucks. i play this tape often my radio show where a woman says, right after obama's elected i'll never have to worry about putting gas in my car again. i'll never have to worry about paying my mortgage. this is obama mania. apparently it still exists. where does this mentality come from? remember the guy that was going, oh, mr. president, oh? remember that guy? >> no. i missed that one. this proves that liberal policies hurt black people. democrats don't care as long as the blacks keep voting for democrats. they keep telling blacks republicans hate you and make fun of us for having no blacks vote for us. the unemployment f
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. trick question. i love everything about this country! including prilosec otc. you know one pill each morning treats your frequent heartburn so you can enjoy all this great land of ours has to offer like demolition derbies. and drive thru weddings. so if you're one of those people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day, block the acid with prilosec otc.. and don't get heartburn in the first place. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. >>> here's a look at the state of the race in the swing states. here's the new polling data we got today. new suffolk university poll showing president obama in virginia up by two points. also brand new nbc/"wall street journal" marist polling on three other swing states showing president obama in nevada up by two. showing president obama in new hampshire up by seven. and showing president obama in north carolina also up by two. because early voting has already started in a majority of swing states, and
. pretty simple. it's not rocket science. >> we'll be watching wednesday night. thank you for a terrific roundtables. for those at home, governor barbour and dean will answer your questions on twitter. >>> and now -- three moments from this week in history. what year was it? >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> a new swing vote on the supreme court. >> judge and now justice kennedy. sounds good, doesn't it? >>> it appears that pan-american flight 103 was bombed. terrorism. >> 270 killed over lockerbie, scotland. >>> and -- the opening night for broadway's longest running show. >> it's far more than an old-fashioned broadway musical. it's very thetheoratical. >> was it 1986, 1987 or 1988? we'll be right back with the answer. >>> so what year was it? and every day since, we've worked hard to keep it. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help people and businesses who were affected, and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy -- and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. we've shared what we've learned with go
, that is a really great question, and that's really sort of a gun is as much political science as anything else. i think a big, a big factor is am i know, i don't want to sound too earthly about this, but the rise of computer redistricting strangely enough, that the members of congress, state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic or all republican. that are relatively few swing states. we've seen a bunch of change in the past couple of election, but that's very much been the exception rather than the rule. so minutes of the house of representatives fear primaries more than they fear generate elections by and large. and does they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that doesn't fully explain the senate, because you can't redistrict the senate, but it is had and he knows impact at the state, state legislature level and the more polarized politics. we have also i think the news media plays a role in this. it used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news, everybody watched walter cronkite or huntley an
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ...and we inspected his brakes for free. -free is good. -free is very good. [ male announcer ] now get 50% off brake pads and shoes at meineke. >>> all right. time now for the "ridiculist." tonight, we're adding all the nonbelievers out there. in case you don't know any 12-year-old girls a believer is what the kids called the super fans of pop star justin bieber. you have the non-beliebers on the "ridiculist." even if you're not familiar with his music, you think music should be in quotation marks when it refers to what he does, you got to admit that young man has one heck of a work ethic. so much so, in fact, that even if he barfs onstage in the middle of a concert, he just keeps on going. >> yeah. he just leaned right over and hurled onstage right in the middle of a song but do you think a little bit of vomit can stop the tiny juggernaut that is justin bieber? no. he just kept on going. later that night, he tweeted this. quote, great show, getting
, recruiting and training math and science teachers to get our children prepared for those important jobs. >> those are goals. those are goals and mitt romney has goals. but when are -- >> no, no andrea -- >> specific. >> it is not a goal to end tax breaks for companies that move jobs overseas and incentivize them to come back and create a million jobs in manufacturingp. we've seen the greatest increase in manufacturing jobs in more than 20 years under this president. so we have a sense of what has to happen in order to bring those businesses back and create those jobs. those aren't goals. you know, reducing our dependence on foreign oil by increasing our domestic production incentivizing clean energy to create jobs and put people back to work, those aren't goals, those are plans to continue to move this economy forward. look, i also hope that mitt romney will take some of the time paul ryan didn't want to take in his interview this weekend and try to explain the arithmetic behind their budget. paul ryan said it would take too long to explain their budget plan. the problem isn't the time
from the institute's medicine, the national academy of science. from a pediatrician, the chair, representing the best in science. as we've looked at -- we did an analysis earlier this week. most schools were serving within this calorie range in the past. the difference is more fruits and vegetables. more leafy greens. more orange vegetables and basically a much healthier meal. >> going to be a shock to the system in the near term and you've got to admire the clever videography of those kids, but at some point, if this is what schools are serving, you know, when, next year? two years? three years? people will automatically go for the healthy stuff? >> i think younger children are already making the adjustment. i think it's harder on high school kids. any parent will tell you even at home, it's a challenge often with teenagers to get them to eat the healthy foods. >> do you think the video was funny or did it hurt your feelings? >> i did. i saw it for the first time last night. >> no hard feelings. >> no hard feelings. we love kansas. >> thank you so much. under secretary for foo
farnsworth, political science professor at the university in virginia on a campaign 2012 and virginia's role as a swing state. also, anthony sanders of george mason university on housing prices. washington journal," lived with your phone calls, every morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> see the first of the presidential debates next wednesday, live on c-span, c- span radio, c-span.org and online. . watch ending date. tonight, a debate at the texas tribune festival between mayor julian castro and ted cruz. and then political fact checkers look at it statements from the obama and ronnie campaigns. then debates for california's seventh congressional district. >> to texas politicians, each touted as the future of their parties, debated the economy, immigration, and other issues at the "texas tribune" festival in austin. julian castro is the mayor of saying antonio and was the keynote speaker at the republican convention. tedthis is one hour. >> i think you know the drill today. i hope you will enjoy as many of those as you can. if you have phones and you're agram,ing to tweet or instr we ask you to
. there are different flavors all come down to science. commercial tomatoes have been scientifically bred to be inexpensive, easy to ship and avail scrabble all year round. nothing wrong with that says this tomato researcher. >> it's an economical crop. part of the reason is the farmer wants maximum yield out of his field. so we have a lot to thank the industry for for developing these. and nobody at that point expected it would have anything to do with the flavor of the fruit when they are ripened. >> reporter: at her lab, powell discovered hybrid commercial tomatoes no longer carry one gene found in heir looms. without it they produce less sugar. in our instant test one off the shelf tomato had just half the sugar. >> 5.5. >> reporter: of the heir loom tomato. sue fwar is only one reason that heirlooms may taste better. >> it smells so good. >> reporter: where and how they are grown counts for a lot. >> tomatoes you get at the supermarket, they look perfect. this one doesn't look perfect. >> to me it looks perfect. >> reporter: these garden variety tomatoes are anything but average to t
tread by our patriarchs, abraham, isaac and jacob, but we blaze new trails in science, technology, medicine, agriculture. in israel the past and the future find common ground. unfortunately that's not the case in many other countries. for today a great battle is being waged between the modern and the medieval. the forces of modernity seek a bright future in which the rights of all are protected. in which an ever expanding digital library is available in the palm of every child. in which every life is sacred. the forces of medievalism seek a world in which women and minorities are subject gentlemen gate, in which -- knowledge is suppressed and not life but death is glorified. these forces clash around the globe. but nowhere more starkly than in the middle east. israel stands proudly with the forces of modernity. we protect the rights of all our citizens. men and women, jews and arabs, muslims and christians, all are equal before the law. israel is also making the world a better place. our scientists win nobel prizes. our know-how is in every cell phone and computer you are using. w
. there is some corals that live for many thousands of yeernz we found through some of the science we do we can drill holes down to the center of the corals and look at annual growth rings and we can look at when, in fact, when the first agriculture in australia happened, we saw a change in the type of chemistry that the annual growth rings and coral were depositing. so we have seen a chronology of increased siltation, of increased fertilization, of
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [oinking] [hissing] [ding] announcer: cook foods to the right temperature using a food thermometer. 3,000 americans will die from food poisoning this year. check your steps at foodsafety.gov. >> we have a big name stock with a new high. ibm. and why is this happening, nicole? >> well, stuart, i was just taking a look at ibm. and taking a look at the price target raised to 240 from 225 over at deutche bank. it's interesting, and now listen to a record intraday here for ibm. this dow component is up nearly 2% today and just talking about the expectations of the refreshed main frame and power plus server, and talking about this, and why they're raising the price target and saying the stock is attractively valued. a new high here for ibm today. 211.27 was the high. >> it's up 12% this year, not bad at all. nicole, thank you very much indeed. dr. ben carson one of the world's best neurosurgeons, if he were 21, 20 years old would he still go to medical school? he joins us from johns hopkins, author of "ameri
paths tried by abraham and jacob. we blaze new trails in science, technology, medicine, agriculture. in israel, the past and the future find common ground. unfortunately, that is not the case in many other countries. today, a great battle is being waged between the modern and the medieval. the forces of maternity seek a bright future -- modernity seek a bright future in which the rights of everyone is protected. in which every life is sacred. the forces of medievalism seek a world in which women and minorities are it segregated and knowledge is suppressed and in which not life, but death is glorified. nowhere more starkly than in the middle east. israel stands proudly with the forces of modernity. we protect the rights of all of our citizens, men and women, jews and arabs, muslims and christians, all are equal before the law. our scientists when noble prizes -- win nobel prizes. we prevent hunger by irrigating land in africa and asia. recently i was deeply moved when i visited one of our technological institutes. i saw a man paralyzed from the waist down climb up a flight of stairs
the permeability of the field. my science, i took geology, soak it helped me. -- so it helped me. i can act as the translator with the policy makers. i enjoyed that part. because the permeability is damaged, it is harder to extract oil from the field, because it is like you are drinking a can of soda. i use this analogy. that more you drink, the less liquid you have in the can, said the less suction unique. your damaging the field. the iraqis are doing that from 2003 to 2007. it is unclear of the damage that has been done to this field. now that you have kurds producing from the northern zone, that is unclear how that interacts, because at some level the three reservoirs can act. what does that mean for care kirk? i do not know. there are other fields that her produce, but what you are getting is at most 500,000 barrels a day, of which 300,000 can go to the pipeline. this does not make turks happy. iraq has problems. they'd be to work on reconnecting these pipelines or trying to get a contractor to kirkuk. kerr ki the political risk is extremely high. i am so focused on the north, and since
. there's no science to that, but when you see the explosion of smart phones they think they could be related. >> clayton: drowning deaths in fact, many parents busy at the pool, and not paying attention, deaths due to drowning and detrimental to see the kids on the smart phone when are' not with them and present, and psychologically. >> alisyn: that part is true, i try to put it away at home and at home, but our playground, oh. >> dave: well, hopefully you're not all-- give us good stories of times you may have been buried in the phone, not grim things, but something silly may have happened, a bump and a bruise, something like that e we'll talk about it later on the show. >> alisyn: to your headlines because new hope for families of victims of 9/11. the new york post reports the city forensic scientists will use a new tool to try to identify new remains, can take dna from bone fragments and identify person's eye and skin color. that's incredible. right now can only determine the sex. 1,120 remains still have not been identified. experts hope that soon they will be able to narrow d
of the house, science, space, and technology committee as well as a confer rei on -- conferee on the faa committee, i realize making the skies safer, less congested, and cleaner requires substantial investments. we must invest in the future, but we have to invest wisely. i'm concerned with the department of transportation, inspector general's april 2012 # report that the en route implementation schedule slipped by four years, and over budgeted by $330 million. in addition, i understand that although progress is being made, the agency has had difficulties in developing performance metrics for next generation goals. i want to thank you chairman petri and ranking member costillo, for holding the hearing, and i look forward to the testimony of the witnesses today because i believe we have to implement the next generation technology. thank you, and i yield back. >> thank you, and now we turn to the first panel, and i'd like to welcome the honorable john portcari, the u.s. secretary of the department of transportation, the acting administrator of the faa. welcome to both of you, and our regula
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)